Thermal Risk for Salmonella in Swine

Thermal Risk for Salmonella in Swine (Drs. Chen-MSU and Zhao)

Salmonellosis remains a major food borne disease threat to public health in the United States. This USDA CSREES NRI funded study is developed to develop cost-effective, pre-harvest interventions, such as ventilation and control of thermal indoor environment, for reducing Salmonella prevalence and thus minimizing the risk of food borne human salmonella associated with pork.

Salmonellosis remains a major food borne disease threat to public health in the United States.  There is a critical need to develop cost-effective, pre-harvest interventions for controlling Salmonella and thus reduce the risk of food borne human Salmonellosis.

This USDA CSREES NRI study was developed to longitudinally evaluate the effect of ventilation and indoor environment of swine barns on salmonella prevalence in finishing swine. A new wireless indoor environment monitoring system (Darr and Zhao, 2008) has been developed and successfully used for this study. Data collection on two swine barns started in the Summer of 2008 and had been finished. Data analyses are on-going. The study will investigate association between indoor environmental parameters and Salmonella prevalence in four swine finishing barns over a 4 year production period.

Knowledge gained from the "Salmonella" project will be used to develop cost-effective, pre-harvest interventions for controlling Salmonella and thus reduce the risk of food borne human salmonella associated with pork consumption. In addition, the study will result in interventions that would have animal health and performance benefits, leading to safe and competitive pork production.